with subtle movement choreographed by Colleen Hughes and Jillian Rose Keys’ understated Lapine costumes — capture a rabbitness that feels organic and noble, not cute or contrived.
— Broad Street Review
this may be the first time— for a few hundred years at least— that the Nurse and Tybalt are played by the same person. Colleen Hughes, in her amazing double turn, is the “Princess of Cats.
— Broad Street Review
Choreography is a standout
— The Philadelphia Inquirer
wonderfully inventive movement and dance coaching
— Stage Magazine
but Jonny and Mauve — with Hughes evoking sympathy as she parts from both her beau and her carefully guarded composure — are harder to read and more complex. Although immensely wounded, they possess a grander sense of the reparations they must try to make
— The Philadelphia Inquirer
“Colleen Hughes, as Jesse’s killer, Robert Ford, makes a transition from lovelorn, rapturous devotion to dead-eyed guilt.”
— Talkin' Broadway
This Tybalt, played by Colleen Hughes (who also gives new and vibrant life to the Nurse in an astonishing shift in other scenes) seethes with a kind of barely containable rage that threatens to spit, like the Prince of Cats, her namesake. She’d be right at home with modern day female action heroes.
— Philly Gay Calendar
Mauve is the play’s steadiest, most relatable character, often dismayed by the others’ eccentricities and passions, and Hughes makes her heartbreakingly genuine.
— Broad Street Review
Colleen Hughes is convincingly callous and street-tough as Tybalt
— Central Voice
Colleen Hughes renders a sensitive depiction of the Nurse
— The Philadelphia Inquirer
Colleen Hughes is also worth noting for her hilarious robotic stiffness as Maria in scenes played against Don Antonio
— DC Metro Theatre Arts
Colleen Hughes shows great range
— Phindie
Hughes’ Tybalt is visibly damaged, her openly carried weaponry unable to protect her from her aunt’s ire, and her irrational hatred of Montagues a stark contrast to her almost desperate devotion and easily-shattered bravado.
. . .
the bulk of the feud’s portrayal falls on Hughes’ Tybalt, whose personal reasons for lashing out seem more urgent than simply continuing an ancient grudge
— Play Shakespeare
Colleen Hughes infuses the teenaged Robert Ford with a babyfaced innocence
— The Philadelphia Inquirer
Colleen Hughes was striking as that trembling, callow youth
— Broad Street Review
Colleen Hughes brings out all the uncomprehending roughness in Rose. She is the wild card among the sisters… Rose needs tending, and Hughes lets us see why while making Rose lovably open and ingenuous. In Hughes’s capable hands, Rose displays the telling traits of a Mundy sister while living in her own world, one even more sealed and unknowable than Kate’s.
— NealsPaper
Colleen Hughes (Ella) and John D’Alonzo (Jorge) turn in particularly animated performances filled with rapid-fire musings on Freudian-style dream analysis.
— Stage Magazine
These six exceptional actresses have a fascinating way of utilizing their bodies to capture the various energies of their characters, varying from when they play men verses when they play women.
— DC Metro Theatre Arts
communicative movement choreography by Colleen Hughes
— Phindie
Colleen Hughes was electric
— Eric's Daily Horiscope
Another scene stealer in the show is Colleen Hughes’ Ilse: a gypsy of sorts who is so fresh and full of life and uninhibited compared to the other girls that you can’t help but fall in love with her. A part of me spent the rest of the show waiting for her character’s return
— Phillyist